A Million in Prevention can be Worth Billions of Cure with Distributed AI Systems


Deep Water Horizon Rig (NOAA)

DeepWater Horizon Rig, April 2010 (NOAA News)

Every year, natural catastrophes (nat cat) are highly visible events that cause major damage across the world. In 2016 the cost of nat cats were estimated to be $175 billion, $50 billion of which were covered by insurance, reflecting severe financial losses for impacted areas.[i]  The total cost of natural catastrophes since 2000 was approximately $2.3 trillion.[ii]

Much less understood is that human-caused catastrophes (hum cat) have resulted in much greater economic damage during the same period and have become increasingly preventable. Since 2000 the world has experienced two preventable hum cat events of $10 trillion or more: the 9/11 terrorist attacks and the global financial crisis. In addition, although the Tōhoku earthquake in Japan was unavoidable, the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster was also preventable, now estimated at $188 billion excluding widespread human suffering and environmental damage.[iii]

One commonality in these and other disasters is that experts issued advanced and accurate evidence-based warnings only to be ignored. The most famous and costly such example was the Phoenix memo issued on July 10, 2001 by Special Agent Kenneth J. Williams.[iv]  The FBI memo was described as “chilling” by the first journalist who reviewed it due to specificity in describing terrorist-linked individuals who were training to fly commercial aircraft.

Williams was a seasoned terrorism expert who followed the prescribed use of the FBI’s rules-based system, yet during the two-month period prior to the 9/11 attacks no relevant action was taken. If the lead had been pursued the terrorist attacks and ensuing events would very likely have been avoided, including two wars with massive casualties and continuing hostilities.

Government agencies have invested heavily in prevention since that fateful day of September 11, 2001 so hopefully similar events will be prevented.

In corporate catastrophes, however, prevention scenarios are usually more complex than the Phoenix memo case. They are also occurring with increasing frequency and expanding in scale and cost.

The remainder of this article can be viewed at Cognitive World.

View brief video by Mark related to this article and Kyield’s new HumCat product.

Mark Montgomery is the founder and CEO of Kyield, originator of the theorem ‘yield management of knowledge’, and inventor of the patented AI system that serves as the foundation for Kyield: ‘Modular System for Optimizing Knowledge Yield in the Digital Workplace’. He can be reached at markm@kyield.com.

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New E-Book: Ascension to a Higher Level of Performance


Power of Transdisciplinary Convergence (Copyright 2015 Kyield All RIghts Reserved)

Power of Transdisciplinary Convergence

Ascension to a Higher Level of Performance 

The Kyield OS: A Unified AI System

By Mark Montgomery
Founder & CEO
Kyield

I just completed an extensive e-book for customers and prospective customers, which should be of interest to all senior management teams in all sectors as the content impacts every aspect of individual and corporate performance.

Our goals in this e-book are fivefold:

  1. Provide a condensed story on Kyield and the voyage required to reach this stage.
  2. Demonstrate how the Kyield OS assimilates disparate disciplines in a unified manner to rapidly improve organizations and then achieve continuous improvement.
  3. Discuss how advances in software, hardware and algorithmics are incorporated in our patented AI system design to accelerate strategic performance and remain competitive.
  4. Detail how a carefully choreographed multi-phase pilot of the Kyield OS can provide the opportunity for an enduring competitive advantage by establishing a continuously adaptive learning organization (CALO).
  5. Educate existing and prospective customers on the Kyield OS as much as possible without disclosing unrecoverable intellectual capital, future patents and trade secrets.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION  1
REVOLUTION IN IT-ENABLED COMPETITIVENESS  2
POWER OF TRANSDISCIPLINARY CONVERGENCE  3
MANAGEMENT CONSULTING  4
COMPUTER SCIENCE AND PHYSICS  5
ECONOMICS AND PSYCHOLOGY  9
LIFE SCIENCE AND HEALTHCARE 10
PRODUCTS AND INDUSTRY PLATFORMS 11
THE KYIELD OS 11
THE KYIELD PERSONALIZED HEALTHCARE PLATFORM 12
ACCELERATED R&D 13
SPECIFIC LIFE SCIENCE AND HEALTHCARE USE CASES 13
BANKING AND FINANCIAL SERVICES 14
THE PILOT PROCESS 15
EXAMPLE: BANKING, PHASE 1 17
PHASE 2 18
PHASE 3 18
PHASE 4 18
CONCLUSION: IN THIS CASE THE END JUSTIFIES THE MEANS  21

To request a copy of this e-book please email me at markm@kyield.com from your corporate email account with job title and affiliation.

White board video presentation on Kyield Enterprise


Kyield founder Mark Montgomery provides a 14 minute white board presentation on Kyield Enterprise and the Kyield Enterprise Pilot

Data Integrity: The Cornerstone for BI in the Decision Process


When studying methods of decision making in organizations, mature professionals with an objective posture often walk away wondering how individuals, organizations, and even our species have survived this long. When studying large systemic crises, it can truly be a game changer in the sport of life, providing motivation that extends well beyond immediate personal gratification.

Structural integrity in organizations, increasingly reflected by data in computer networking, has never been more important. The decision dimension is expanding exponentially due to data volume, global interconnectedness, and increased complexity, thus requiring much richer context, well-engineered structure, far more automation, and increasingly sophisticated techniques.

At the intersection of the consumer realm, powerful new social tools are available worldwide that have proven valuable in affecting change, but blind passion is ever-present, as is self-serving activism from all manner of guild. Ideology surrounding the medium plays a disproportionate role in phase 3 of the Internet era, to include crowdsourcing, social networking, and mainstream journalism. Sentiment can be measured more precisely today, but alignment is allusive, durability questionable, and integrity rare.

Within the enterprise, managers are dealing with unprecedented change, stealthy risk, and compounding complexity driven in no small part by technology. Multi-billion dollar lapses sourced from multiple directions have become common, including a combination of dysfunctional decision processes, group/herding error, self-destructive compensation models, conflicting interests, and poorly designed enterprise architecture relative to actual need.

Specifically to enterprise software, lack of flexibility, commoditization, high maintenance costs, and difficulty in tailoring has created serious challenges for crisis prevention, innovation, differentiation, and global competitiveness. It is not surprising then, given exponential growth of data, which often manifests in poor decisions in complex environments, Business Intelligence (BI) is a top priority in organizations of all types. BI is still very much in its infancy, however, often locked in the nursery, subjecting business analysts to dependency on varying degrees of IT functionality to unlock the gate to the data store.

Given the importance of meaningful, accurate data to the mission of the analyst and future of the organization, recent track records in decision making, and challenges within the organization and IT industry, it is not surprising that analysts would turn to consultants and cloud applications seeking alternative methods, even when aware of extending the vicious cycle of data silos.

Unfortunately, while treating the fragmented symptoms of chronic enterprise maladies may provide brief episodic relief, only a holistic approach specifically designed to address the underlying root causes is capable of satisfying the future needs of high performance organizations.

The dirty dozen fault lines to look for in structural integrity of data

  1. Does your EA automatically validate the identity of the source in a credible manner? (Y/N)

  2. Is your IT security redundant, encrypted, bio protected, networked, and physical?  (Y/N)

  3. Are your data languages interoperable internally and externally? (Y/N)

  4. Is the enterprise fully integrated with customers, partners, social networking, and communications? (Y/N)

  5. Do you have a clear path for preventing future lock-in from causing unnecessary cost, complexity, and risk?  (Y/N)

  6. Are data rating systems tailored to specific needs of the individual, business unit, and organization? (Y/N)

  7. Are original work products of k-workers protected with pragmatic, automated permission settings? (Y/N)

  8. Does each knowledge worker have access to organizational data essential to their mission? (Y/N)

  9. Are compensation models driving mid to long-term goals, and well aligned with lowering systemic risk? (Y/N)

  10. Is counter party risk integrated with internal systems as well as best available external data sources? (Y/N)

  11. Does your organization have enterprise-wide, business unit, and individual data optimization tools? (Y/N)

  12. Are advanced analytics and predictive technologies plug and play? (Y/N)

If you answered yes (Y) to all of these questions, then your organization is well ahead of the pack; even if perhaps a bit lonely. If you answered no (N) to any of these questions, then your organization likely has existing fault lines in structural integrity that will need to be addressed in the near future.  The fault lines may or may not be visible even to the trained professional, until the next crisis of course, at which time it becomes challenging for management to focus on anything else.