Background of patent #8005778


I am working on multiple articles relating to the patent I was issued last week, at least one of which will be posted here in the next few days, but in the interim I thought some might be interested in the common English portion of the patent. I hadn’t visited this section in some time–from early 2006.

Patent #8005778

Title: Modular System for Optimizing Knowledge Yield In the Digital Workplace (USPTO link to patent)

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The invention relates to the management of human intellectual capital within computer networked organizations, and more particularly to managing the quantity and quality of digital work flow of individual knowledge workers and work groups for the purpose of increasing knowledge yield, or output.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The volume of data transfer and related human consumption of information is growing exponentially in the network era, resulting in a condition commonly referred to as information overload. The result for the modern organization is an ever increasing challenge to manage the quantity and quality of information being transferred, consumed, and stored within computer networks.

Enormous amounts of structured and unstructured information is being consumed by knowledge workers that is redundant or irrelevant to the knowledge worker’s job, or the mission of the organization, creating serious challenges for organizations while reducing the return on investment for information technologies and knowledge workers.

Systems deployed previously attempting to reduce information overload and increase knowledge worker productivity have been designed primarily to address either the symptoms of the problem, or a specific portion thereof; including desktop productivity suites, higher performance search engines, and reducing unsolicited e-mail.

In recent years, computer standards bodies have been approaching the challenge by improving machine to machine automation and structure to documents with XML, RDF, SOAP, and OWL, commonly referred to as the Semantic Web.

Emerging positions within networked organizations attempting to optimize the digital workplace include the Chief Knowledge Officer (hereinafter “CKO”) who is responsible for improving the value of human and intellectual capital to better achieve the organization’s mission.

Despite these individual and collective efforts, the problems associated with information overload continue to grow exponentially. According to research firms IDC and Delphi Group, the average knowledge worker spends about a quarter of his or her day looking for information.

A related serious problem for knowledge workers affecting productivity and innovation is that intellectual property converted to digital form is simple to copy and distribute, providing disincentives for creative problem solving, the sharing of knowledge and intellectual property, and therefore improving work quality.

Given the complexities of the digital workplace environment, it would be beneficial for organizations to employ a holistic metadata system including modules to manage the knowledge yield for the entire organization, for each work group within the organization, and each individual member of the organization so they can continually optimize his/her knowledge yield for the continuously changing work environment.

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Diabetes and the American Healthcare System


I am pleased to share our just completed healthcare use case scenario in story telling format.

We selected diabetes mellitus (type 2) as a scenario to demonstrate the value of the Kyield platform to healthcare. Given the very high cost of healthcare in the U.S. currently with an unsustainable economic trajectory, it’s essential that costs be driven lower while improving care. Diabetes type 2 has direct costs exceeding $200 billion annually in the U.S. alone, the majority of which is entirely preventable.

The most obvious method to overcome this significant challenge is with far more intelligent HIT systems. It is not surprising that the legislation appears to be perfectly matched for the Kyield PaaS– nor is it entirely accidental as our mission aligns well with the needs in healthcare; an R&D process that began more than a decade ago.

This was a challenging scenario to develop and write due to the complexity of the disease, large body of regulations, incomplete standards, and varying interests between the partners in the ecosystem.  A bit of extra personal motivation for me was that my father died a few years ago from complications from diabetes, which was diagnosed shortly after my brother died of ALS. Ever since the shocking phone call from my brother informing me of his “death sentence” in the summer of 1997, I have followed ALS research; among the most complex and brutal diseases.

Diabetes type 2 is also complex, but unlike ALS and many other diseases, diabetes type 2 is largely preventable with a relatively modest change in behavior and lifestyle– modest indeed particularly compared to the later stage affects of the disease in absence of prevention, which we highlight in this use case. It’s difficult to understand after watching my father’s disease progress for a decade why anyone would not want to prevent diabetes– it literally destroys the human body.

I hope you find the case interesting and valuable. I am confident that if followed in a similar path as outlined in this scenario, the platform will contribute to significantly more effective prevention and healthcare delivery at a lower cost.

Diabetes Use Case Scenario (PDF)

Mark Montgomery